Create your own Interactive Fiction

ADRIFT - Interactive Fiction  
Home   |   News ADRIFT News RSS   |   Screenshots   |   Download   |   Games ADRIFT Reviews RSS   |   Forum   |   Help   |   Links
Welcome Guest Register | Login
Popular Games
The PK Girl
Ghost Town
Emily
Top Hat
the virtual human
Give Me your Lunch Money 2010
The Fortress of Fear
Trick of Treat
The Spectre of Castle Coris
The Lost Children
 
Latest Forum Posts
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Saabie & Duncan
Worst Case Scenario
ADRIFT v4 versus ADRIFT v5 (Larry & David only! :) )
Larry's Images
Bump this if you're in the chat
Campbell & the future of ADRIFT
Error: Input past the end of file
IFComp 2017 Games Announced
CYOA/IF hybrids: suggestions needed
Accessibility for the blind?
 
Latest Reviews
Tingalan
Trick of Treat
The Last Expedition
The Tartarus Project
The Lost Children
The Fortress of Fear
The Warlord, The Princess & The Bulldog
Die Feuerfaust
The Spectre of Castle Coris
The Dragon Diamond

Make a donation

Get it from CNET Download.com!
Marika the Offering
By
4 out of 5 (1 review)  
Download
marika.zip
marika.zip

The sun is setting and time is running out. You must take charge of your own destiny and stop The Count from getting into The Tower.

This is the latest version, with a couple of minor fixes following feedback from the 2007 One Room Comp.

Placed 3rd in the 2007 One Room Competition.
Placed joint 3rd in the 2007 InsideADRIFT End of Year Competition.

Cursor  Details
Genre: Fiction 
Language: Unknown 
IFID: Unknown 
Category: Complete adventure 
Forgiveness rating: Unknown 
Total Downloads: 179 
File Size: 30 Kb 
Version: Unknown
 

Cursor  Member Reviews
1 Ratings
5 star:
 (0)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (0)
2 star:
 (0)
1 star:
 (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Member Rating
 
 
 
Share your thoughts with other members:
 
Most Helpful Member Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
  Cleverly designed, well worth playing., Tue 4th Sep 2012
By Duncan_B - See all my reviews

After mazes, the next tropes in interactive fiction to wear themselves out entirely were probably the “Escape the Room” [ETR] format and death. Seeing yet another ETR game is enough to make a seasoned IF player roll their eyes. They tend to be basically plotless, decontextualized setups for a puzzle rather than a good story. If you have to stuff something under a door to catch a key, it's probably enough to make a player quit. We've seen that game with that puzzle so many times and in so many incarnations that it was now beneath our notice, like spam. And the last thing we want to do is to die over and have to restart our attempts every time, especially on something so limited.

But Marika the Offering offers a fully contextualized, narratively complete game with an interesting story and a structure that subverts our basic aversion to death by turning the ETR format on its head. No longer is your goal to escape from a locked room (though a nice thought, the attempt would be futile). Your goal is to lock the room and keep a vampire from coming in.

Obvious means of entry and ways to bar them start the player out proactively, which is good because they're about to lose. When the player feels they have finally blocked off all they can they go to sleep (or else they'll run out of turns and fall asleep anyway). The player then get to watch how the villain enters the room to kill our heroine. In this way, each death is a clue in solving the overall puzzle of the game. Rather than an annoyance, the author has made death into a service to the player. Aside from presenting a challenge, the continued inventiveness of the (rather traditional) shapeshifting vampire at gaining entry into the tower room becomes a running gag that's amusing to read. Especially if you're a completionist, the flow of the game becomes more about blocking one entrance at a time and then dying, then blocking the next, rinse lather, repeat.

There are a couple of tricky commands to execute in this game where players might run into Guess the Verb troubles. It's also worth noting that the game is inventoryless, preferring to let players use things from where they lie rather than making them pick all of them up explicitly. This lets players focus on examining their surroundings and blocking exits rather than acquiring objects.

Overall, this is a rewarding, not overlong game with difficulty neatly balanced on a knife point, worthy of as many plays through as it has deaths. Highly recommended.

© 2013 Campbell Wild. All rights reserved. | Contact the Webmaster